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News From Around the Web

  • Two education enemies – Diane Ravitch and Whitney Tilson – find some common ground – Washington Post

    Two education enemies – Diane Ravitch and Whitney Tilson – find some common ground – Washington Post

    Two well-known education advocates with very different political perspectives and approaches to education reform have compiled a list of things they agree on. Among the items historian and author Diane Ravitch and investor and charter school advocate Whitney Tilson agreed on is that "in fighting for the interests of teachers, unions are doing exactly what they’re supposed to."
  • Teacher Appreciation Week is not enough, says North Carolina Teacher of the Year

    Teacher Appreciation Week is not enough, says North Carolina Teacher of the Year

    Teacher Appreciation Week is great, writes North Carolina Teacher of the Year, but it's not enough for "the world's most under-rated and noble profession." Much like water pipelines, roads, and bridges, he writes, "if necessary attention isn't paid to the support and maintenance of this system, all of us are made to suffer as a result."
  • College grads enter job market burdened by record debt – USA Today

    College grads enter job market burdened by record debt – USA Today

    "Along with their new diplomas, this year's graduates will leave campus with an average of $28,950 of student debt, according to the latest figures from The Institute for College Access & Success, an independent nonprofit research organization. The institute found that from 2004 to 2014 the share of graduates with debt rose modestly from 65% to 69%, but the average debt at graduation rose at more than twice the rate of inflation."
  • Mispronouncing students’ names: A slight that can cut deep – Education Week

    Mispronouncing students’ names: A slight that can cut deep – Education Week

    For students, especially the children of immigrants or those who are English-language learners, a teacher who knows their name and can pronounce it correctly signals respect and marks a critical step in helping them adjust to school.